This day in history

The History Channel has a “this day in history” page on its site at http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history.  This first week of January has several things related to Spanish–Cuba and Batista, Panama and Noriega, and the debut of the Euro.  There is a Spanish version of the site, but it only has limited information.

I was thinking that this might make for a quick daily or weekly activity to provide context for past tense verbs and also get in a little cross curricular information.  It could also be good for numbers, such as the year and how long ago something happened.  Maybe even be the starting point for a lesson related to the historical event.  Spanish I just learned numbers to 100, and I wanted to go further with that and learn numbers into the hundreds.  We are also supposed to start a unit about school this week, so I can give them CI about the Euro (debuted January 4, 1999) and they can work with numbers and buying school supplies using Euros.  Maybe we can find things to “buy” at the Corte Inglés (http://www.elcorteingles.es/tienda/papeleria).  This site has nice printable play Euros:    http://www.activityvillage.co.uk/printable_play_money.htm   For elementary students, there is Euro counting practice for the SMART board at http://exchange.smarttech.com/details.html?id=ba44b6c7-59d3-48fc-aeb1-112f37ac506a

I like this idea of a CI-based daily activity to start class.  Noah Geisel has a weekly plan that he shares in his conference presentations.  He devotes each day of the week to a specific activity, such as an artwork, a commercial, a saying, a joke, a news headline, a tweet from Twitter, etc.  You can find his weekly plan outline in this presentation of his at:  http://prezi.com/sdpvi-rvxhz3/ntprs-2010/

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